A Photographer Viewed The ISS With Crew Dragon Passing In Front Of The Sun (Video)



Thierry Legault, a well-known French astrophotographer and amateur astronomer, viewed the solar passage of the International Space Station with Crew Dragon. Legault, who managed to record those moments, posted the video in question on his Twitter account.

World-renowned astrophotographer and amateur astronomer Thierry Legault is talking 
about a series of images he has taken at the moment. The photographer who managed to view the International Space Station's (ISS) solar crossing with the recently realized Crew Dragon posted a 50-second video on his Twitter account today showing those moments. The video also shows the International Space Station's robotic arm, Canadarm2, being seen for the first time during the transition. Legault took good turns from many space enthusiasts with this share.

Thierry Legault also quoted his shot being carried out with an Olympus E-M1 II mirrorless camera mounted on the CFF 20 mm f/8 APO reflector telescope and a Baader Herschel solar prism. This sharing of the photographer was also quite instructive for amateur astrophotographers looking for guides on equipment. Moving at 27 thousand km per hour, it took only 0.6 seconds for the International Space Station to pass past the sun from Legault's vantage point.


|He also managed to view Crew Dragon:



Thierry Legault was able to capture the first-ever Canadarm2 pass photos, as well as the Crew Dragon capsule of Elon Musk's company SpaceX, which took two American astronauts to the International Space Station at the end of May. The big event had been when SpaceX, the space transport company, sent two astronauts raised by NASA into space.

For the first time in history, the mission of Crew Dragon, where a government-independent private company sent humans into space, had to be delayed twice due to adverse weather conditions, but eventually the team succeeded and the capsule was launched into space. The astronauts Douglas Hurley and Bob Behnken were the first astronauts in history to be sent into space by a private company. Similarly, Thierry Legault, who managed to make his name with the firsts he performed and whose work in this field is followed by people from all walks of life, is also eagerly awaited.
Ads go here

Comments

Contact Form

Send